The HED Program

A Series of conservation and passive solar energy courses for graduate and upper division undergraduate students of architecture , landscape architecture, engineering and planning.

These courses are organized into five levels, increasing in details and in complexities:

LEVEL I

CONSERVATION AND PASSIVE SOLAR ENERGY CONCEPTS, FUNDAMENTALS, AND PRACTICE IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: (ARC 461d/561d)

Presents a complete overview of energy conservation and passive solar fundamentals and concepts applied to building design. The information includes; solar astronomical relations and radiation physics and measurements, physiological approach to human thermal comfort and comfort zones, climatic analysis, microclimatic modifications, and materials specification and heat transfer principles. Level I terminates with a methodology of passive solar design based on a developed hand-method calculation. The methodology includes initial design decisions in building programming, location, orientation, form and materials. Finally, the thermal performance is predicted through calculation and includes energy heat gain/loss plots, design drawings, recommendations, and conclusions.

LEVEL II

COMPUTER IMPLEMENTATION IN ENERGY CONSERVATION AND PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN: (ARCH 461d/561d)

This basic level introduces the implementation of computer energy simulation programs into solar designs. Several energy simulation programs are generally discussed and the CalPas3 program is specifically explained. CalPas3, by the Berkeley Solar Group, is one of the most sophisticated energy programs available and is used throughout this level and the advanced levels. Building energy evaluation is achieved first by the creation of an input file which describes the design components of a surveyed house to CalPas3. The results are then validated, checked for compliance with codes, and analyzed for potential energy saving strategies. A computer parametric analysis is then conducted to optimize these strategies and from which output reports are generated. Finally, recommendations for design enhancement and conclusions are made and presented by each student.

LEVEL III

ADVANCED PASSIVE SOLAR TECHNOLOGY AND COMPUTER APPLICATION: (ARC 461e/561e)

An advanced and elaborate course that deals with passive solar soft technologies such as: Trombe walls, Thermo-siphoned mass walls, Water walls, Sunspaces, Roof ponds, Kloss windows, Clear view collectors, Cool towers, Under-slab Rockbeds, etc. These advanced systems are selected and used by each student to fine-tune his/her passive solar design. The thermal performance of each of these features is explained and the CalPas3 program is used to evaluate the system being used. This insures accuracy and provides necessary speed with which selected systems or combination of systems can be analyzed. Presentation of final project is required by each student.

LEVEL IV

ECONOMIC OPTIMIZATION FOR ENERGY CONSERVATION AND PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN GUIDELINES: (ARC 900)

The economic analysis explained in this course provides solar design guidelines based on balancing the incremental cost/benefit of energy conservation (level II) and advanced passive solar strategies (level III). The guidelines also take account of the solar and weather characteristics of each location. Conservation optimization is first achieved based on local cost estimates giving optimum conservation levels. Second, a constrained optimization based on an "optimum mix" between conservation and solar systems is introduced; i.e., balancing conservation and solar to minimize annual auxiliary cost of non-renewable energy relative to a fixed initial investment. In general, the guidelines provide a reasonable starting point for a well balanced solar design but they do not substitute for thermal evaluation later in the design process. Therefore the results are tested and validated through the CalPas3 energy simulation program.

LEVEL V

DESIGN / BUILD SPECIAL PROJECTS WORKSHOP: (ARC 497b/567b, section 14)

Each semester students select from a variety of passive-solar heating and cooling devices for design and construction. This workshop promotes students learning through hands-on site work experience.