Arthur C. (Christian "Chris") Nelson, FAICP, has made significant contributions to the fields of: real estate analysis including the role of changing demographics in shifting long-term real estate development trends; urban growth management and  open space preservation, central city revitalization; infrastructure financing; planning effectiveness; transportation and land use outcomes; metropolitan development patterns; the economic effects of facility location; the role of suburban redevelopment in reshaping metropolitan America; and the new “megapolitan” geography of the United States.

Contents

  1. Professional and Academic Life
  2. Significant Scholarly Contributions
  3. Sources
  4. References

Professional and Academic Life

Arthur C. Nelson is Professor of Urban Planning and Real Estate Development at the University of Arizona. He is also Presidential Professor Emeritus of City & Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah where, from 2008-2014, he served as founding Director of the Metropolitan Research Center, Adjunct Professor of Finance in the David Eccles School of Business, and founding Co-Director of the Master of Real Estate Development program.

Between 2002 and 2008, Dr. Nelson was founding Director of the Urban Affairs and Planning program at Virginia Tech’s Alexandria Center where he was also Co-Director (with Robert E. Lang) of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech, and founder of the Planning Academy at Virginia Tech. From 1987 to 2002, he was Professor of City and Regional Planning in the College of Architecture and Professor of Public Policy in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and between 2000 and 2002 he was Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgia State University. With Julian Conrad Juergensmeyer he co-founded the nation’s only bi-university dual master of planning (Georgia Tech) and juris doctor (Georgia State) degree program. Dr. Nelson’s academic career started as visiting Assistant Professor of Regional and Community Planning at Kansas State University (1984-85) and then as Associate Professor of Urban and Public Affairs (now Planning and Urban Studies) at the University of New Orleans (1986-87) where he was Adjunct Professor of Social Work at Southern University New Orleans.

Dr. Nelson received his Bachelor of Science degree in political science with certificates in Urban Studies and Social Service at Portland State University in 1972. As a consultant in planning and fiscal analysis along the West Coast based in Portland, Oregon for a dozen years (1972-1984), he returned to Portland State where he received the Master of Urban Studies degree (1976) and later the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Urban Studies specializing in regional science and regional planning in 1984.

Dr. Nelson has received numerous distinctions over his academic career. He is a member of College of Fellows of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP), was commissioned Honorary Lieutenant Colonial by the Georgia Governor, received research, teaching and scholarship awards, and was advisor to students winning the AICP national student project of the year award. He has also served as editor of Housing Policy Debate[21], associate editor of the Journal of Urban Affairs, and Planners’ Notebook editor and associate editor of the Journal of the American Planning Association. He serves in other editorial capacities for several journals.

Significant Scholarly Contributions

Urban containment and open space preservation Dr. Nelson was the first to demonstrate empirically how land markets respond to urban containment that includes Greenfield preservation. Urban containment will steer regional market demand for development to areas inside urban containment boundaries (UCBs) with the effect that the value of land for urban development rises inside UCBs and falls outside them. The value of land for farming and other working landscape uses rises as with respect to distance from UCBs because the closer to the boundary such land is, the more it is impacted adversely by negative externalities imposed by urban neighborhoods. On the other hand, the value of land just inside the UCB falls with respect to UCB distance because the positive effects of Greenbelt amenities diminish. Dr. Nelson argued for schemes that capture positive land use gains inside the UCB to compensate for losses outside. Dr. Nelson also showed that the aggregate effect of leapfrog urban development patterns is to push the value of land for working landscape purposes below that which may sustain economically viable operations.[24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33]

Urban containment and central city revitalization Dr. Nelson and his colleagues have shown that by ameliorating the outward expansion of urban development, urban containment can accelerate the redevelopment of central cities.[34] [35] [36]

The social benefits of urban containment While urban containment can be viewed as restricting the supply of land for development thereby raising housing prices and generally undermining efficient urban development, Nelson and his colleagues have shown otherwise. Effective urban containment planning increases development densities, facilitates mixed-use development, reduces inefficient land development, increases employment, improves fiscal resilience, and reduces socioeconomic segregation.[37] [38] [39] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47] [48] [49]

Infrastructure financing Critical to managing urban growth is providing public facilities to accommodate it. Ideally, users of public facilities will pay their proportionate costs. Otherwise, higher-cost development may be subsidized by lower-cost development resulting in economically perverse outcomes. Dr. Nelson has helped pioneer methodologies to achieve economically efficient pricing of public facilities as well as studies showing how such pricing leads to efficient land use patterns. [50] [51] [52] [53] [54] [55] [56] [57]

Plan effectiveness Land use plans are made in part to improve development outcomes. Whether plans are effective in doing so is illusive because of counter-factual complications. Dr. Nelson has helped pioneer the field of measuring the effectiveness of land use plans by showing plans can achieve their intended objectives of mitigating impacts of natural hazards[58] such as seismic events.[59] He has also pioneered metrics to evaluate comprehensive plan outcomes with respect to several planning objectives showing that plans can affect desired outcomes.[60] [61] [62] [63] [64]

Transportation and land use outcomes Through a series of studies in Atlanta, Dr. Nelson developed and tested theories on how the land market responds to transit stations.  Because Atlanta is viewed by many analysts as the nation's most sprawling metropolitan area, he reasoned that if the market responded positively to the presence and location of transit stations in Atlanta in ways he theorized, one could conclude reasonably that rail transit per se could influence urban form and regional development patterns.  Dr. Nelson found that residential neighborhoods of differing incomes valued proximity to neighborhood transit stations positively.[65] [66] He was also the first to confirm statistically that commercial property values rise with respect to transit station proximity and that transit ridership increases when developments are clustered around transit stations.[67] [68] Finally, through his research he found statistical evidence that even in the nation's most sprawled and most automobile-dependent metropolitan area, rail transit influences regional development patterns[69] and in ways that confer important social benefits.[70]  Dr. Nelson’s research in these areas helps planners understand the relationship between rail transit and urban form in contemporary metropolitan areas.

American exurbanization Dr. Nelson pioneered much of the current insights into the drivers of “exurbanization” which he characterizes as the suburbs of the suburbs.  His early work characterized exurbanization[71] [72] [73] and the role of exurban industrialization in facilitating it.[74] [75]  [76] His later work evaluates the behavioral motivations underlying exurban settlement, calling into question whether exurbanization is nothing more than the "suburbanization of suburbs".[77] [78]  Because of its land-consumptive nature and because it is fueled by the motivation to escape from urban areas, exurbanization could very well pose the greatest planning challenge in the next century.[79] [80] Dr. Nelson's work is pioneering in bringing to the attention of planners and scholars the implications of exurbanization.[81] [82]

Economic effects of facility location Dr. Nelson pioneered studies evaluating the economic effects of landfills, major sports stadiums, beltways, and regional sewerage systems. Contradicting findings in the industry, he found that landfills had adverse effects on residential property values up to a few miles away.[83] [84]  In another, study, Dr. Nelson was the first to show conclusively that the most economically beneficial place in which to locate sports stadiums is in a central business district.[85] [86] He also found that locating a stadium elsewhere can lead to neighborhood blight.[87]  In the third study, Dr. Nelson found that beltways, especially multiple layers of beltways, reduce retail and service trade at the metropolitan scale by reducing the income-density thresholds needed to sustain local-serving operations.[88] Dr. Nelson and his colleagues also found that regional-scale sewerage systems with associated land-use planning has the effect of reducing development costs, thereby shifting regional development away from areas served by smaller systems to regions served by larger systems.[89]

Plan effectiveness Do plans matter? That is, can long-range comprehensive plans actually affect the desired outcomes? They can but only when plans have clear, measurable objectives and are implemented by regulatory tools designed to meet those objectives. This finding was confirmed when Dr. Nelson and his colleagues discovered the relationship between the factual basis of local plans and policies in mitigating damage associated with natural disasters, such as earthquakes and flooding.[90] [91] [92] In other work, Dr. Nelson has demonstrated that implementing plans based on factually-grounded projections of development needs is effective at reducing financial risk associated with overbuilding.[93] [94] In a series of studies based on Oregon’s statewide land-use planning process,[95] Dr. Nelson and colleagues demonstrated that plans with factual bases, clear objectives, measurable benchmarks, and rigorous implementation can achieve desired outcomes in preserving open spaces while also meeting urban development needs.[96] [97] [98] [99] [100] As global climate change becomes an leading planning challenge, state and local governments may need to elevate plan quality and implementation rigor to mitigate potentially adverse outcomes.[101]

Planning implications of demographic and economic change Based on demographic and changes in consumer preferences, Dr. Nelson was among the first to show that America has more homes on large lots than the market demands.[102] By some accounts, he also created a new field of projecting large-scale nonresidential redevelopment opportunities that may be sufficient to meet all future development needs of nearly all metropolitan areas to about mid-century.[103] [104] [105] [106] [107]

The role of suburban redevelopment in reshaping metropolitan America Dr. Nelson’s research is helping inform planning and development processes of the key role that American suburbs will play in meeting future development needs.[108] Indeed, while the demand for downtown housing may be increasing it will account for only one to two percent of the entire demand in nearly all metropolitan areas.[109] In contrast, most of America’s opportunity to meet future development needs is through the redevelopment of its suburbs.[110] This demand will result in the rise of more suburban “downtowns” albeit of many different types based on their market contexts.[111] Moreover, based on survey research, Dr. Nelson finds that members of the “baby boom” generation (those born between 1946 and 1964) may be instrumental in reshaping suburban America.[112]

The new “megapolitan” geography of the United States Until 1900, most people in the United States lived in rural areas. Over the next half century, America’s central cities accounted for most of the nation’s population. By 1980, the urban population was comprised mostly of suburban residents but the rise of suburbia belied a more fundamental shift in America’s economic geography. Using rigorous analytic techniques, Dr. Nelson and his colleagues have created a new view of America’s economic geography: the rise of Megapolitan America. By 2040, America will be comprised of 23 economic regions composed of multiple core-based statistical areas that form a coherent economic unit. Nelson and his colleagues argue that for America to be globally competitive, it needs to leverage the economic advantages these Megapoltian areas offer.[113] [114] [115]

Selected Book References

Arthur C. Nelson. 2014. Foundations of Real Estate Development Financing: A Guide for Public-Private Partnerships. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Arthur C. Nelson. 2013. Reshaping Metropolitan America: Trends and Opportunities to 2030. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Arthur C. Nelson, Richard Pruetz and Doug Woodruff. 2012. The TDR Handbook: Planning and Designing Transfer of Development Rights Programs. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Arthur C. Nelson and Robert E. Lang. 2011. Megapolitan America:  A New Vision for Understanding America’s Metropolitan Geography. Chicago: American Planning Association.

Arthur C. Nelson, James C. Nicholas and Julian C. Juergensmeyer. 2009.  Impact Fees: Principles and Practice of Proportionate-Share Development Fees. Chicago: American Planning Association.

Arthur C. Nelson and Robert E. Lang, 2009. The New Politics of State Planning. Washington, DC: Urban Land Institute.

Arthur C. Nelson, John Randolph, Joseph Schilling, Jonathan Logan, James McElfish, and Newport Partners, 2009. Environmental Regulations and Housing Costs. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Arthur C. Nelson, Liza Bowles, Julian C. Juergensmeyer and James C. Nicholas. 2008. A Guide to Impact Fees and Housing Affordability. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Arthur C. Nelson, Thomas W. Sanchez, Casey J. Dawkins. 2007. Second, revised printing 2008. The Social Impacts of Urban Containment. Hampshire, UK: Ashgate. Nominated for the Paul Davidoff Award. Book is in second printing.

Arthur C. Nelson and Casey J. Dawkins. 2004. Urban Containment in the United States. Chicago: American Planning Association. 

Arthur C. Nelson. 2004. Planners Estimating Guide: Projecting Land-Use and Facility Needs. Chicago: American Planning Association.

Arthur C. Nelson and James B. Duncan. 1995. Growth Management Principles and Practice. Chicago: American Planning Association.

Arthur C. Nelson. 1995. Water, Wastewater, and Stormwater System Development Charges. Boca Raton, FL: CRC and Lewis Publishers. 

Gerrit J. Knaap and Arthur C. Nelson. 1993. The Regulated Landscape: Lessons of Statewide Planning From Oregon. Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.  Several printings. Translated into Chinese in 2003. 

James C. Nicholas, Arthur C. Nelson, and Julian C. Juergensmeyer. 1991. A Practitioner's Guide to Development Impact Fees. Chicago, IL: American Planning Association. 

Arthur C. Nelson, ed. 1988. Development Impact Fees: Theory, Issues, and Practice. Chicago, IL: American Planning Association. 

 




[24] Arthur C. Nelson. 1985. "An Overview of Greenbelt Influences on Regional Land Values: Implications for Regional Planning Policy," Growth and Change 16(2): 43-48.

[25] Arthur C. Nelson. 1985. "Demand, Segmentation, and Timing Effects of an Urban Containment Program on Urban Fringe Land Values." Urban Studies 22(4): 439-443.

[26] Arthur C. Nelson. 1986. "Using Land Markets to Evaluate Urban Containment Programs." Journal of the American Planning Association 52(2): 156-71.

[27] Arthur C. Nelson. 1987. "Towards a Theory of the American Rural Residential Land Market." Journal of Rural Studies 2(4): 309-319.

[28] Arthur C. Nelson. 1988. "Additional and Reduced Demand/Amenity and Disamenity Increment Recapture: Considerations of Urban Containment Policies." Real Estate Issues 13(1): 47-51.

[29] Arthur C. Nelson. 1988. "An Empirical Note on How Regional Urban Containment Policy Influences An Interaction Between Greenbelt and Exurban Land Markets." Journal of the American Planning Association 54(3): 178-184.

[30] Gerrit J. Knaap and Arthur C. Nelson. 1993. The Regulated Landscape: Lessons of Statewide Planning From Oregon. Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

[31] Arthur C. Nelson. 1993. The Urban Growth Boundary as a Growth Management Tool. In Planning the Oregon Way: A Twenty-Year Appraisal, Carl Abbott and Deborah Howe, eds. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Press.

[32] Arthur C. Nelson. 1991. "The Analytic Basis for Farmland Preservation Policies," Journal of Rural Studies 6(3): 337-346.

[33] Arthur C. Nelson. 1992. "Preserving Prime Farmland in the Face of Urbanization," Journal of the American Planning Association 58(4): 467-488. 

[34] Arthur C. Nelson and Raymond J. Burby. 2005. The Effect of Regional Smart Growth on Metropolitan Growth and Construction: A Preliminary Assessment. In Fritz W. Wagner, et al. eds, Revitalizing the City: Strategies to Contain Sprawl and Revive the Core. Birmingham, AL: M.E. Sharpe.

[35] Arthur C. Nelson, Raymond J. Burby, Edward Feser, Casey J. Dawkins, Roberto Quercia, and Emil Malizia. 2004. “Urban Containment and Central City Revitalization.” Journal of the American Planning Association 70(4): 411-425.

[36] Casey J. Dawkins and Arthur C. Nelson. 2003. “Statewide Growth Management Policy and Central City Revitalization.” Journal of the American Planning Association. 69(4): 381-396.

[37] Arthur C. Nelson, Thomas W. Sanchez, Casey J. Dawkins. 2007. Second, revised printing 2008. The Social Impacts of Urban Containment. Hampshire, UK: Ashgate.

[38] Arthur C. Nelson, Casey Dawkins, Thomas Sanchez and Karen Danielson. 2006. Urban Containment Effects on Housing and Neighborhood Quality in Florida. In Charles Connerly ed., Growth Management in Florida: A 20-Year Assessment. Birmingham, AL: M.E. Sharpe.

[39] Rolf Pendall, Arthur C. Nelson, Casey J. Dawkins, and Gerrit-Jan Knaap. 2005. Connecting Smart Growth, Housing Affordability, and Racial Equity. In Xavier de Sousa Briggs, ed., The Geography of Opportunity: Race and Housing Choice in Metropolitan America, pp. 219-245. Washington: Brookings Institution.

[40] Arthur C. Nelson, Rolf Pendall, Casey J. Dawkins and Gerrit J. Knaap. 2004. Growth Management and Affordable Housing: The Academic Evidence.

[41] Arthur C. Nelson. 2004. Urban Containment American Style. In Christine Bae and Harry Richardson, Urban Sprawl in Europe and the United States. London: Ashton.

[42] Arthur C. Nelson. 1999. Growth Management. In  Practice of Local Government Planning, ICMA/APA publishers, Frank S. So, editor.

[43] Arthur C. Nelson, Casey J. Dawkins and Thomas W. Sanchez. 2005. The Effect of Urban Containment and Mandatory Housing Elements on Racial Segregation in US Metropolitan Areas. Journal of Urban Affairs 26(3): 339-350.

[44] Arthur C. Nelson, Thomas W. Sanchez and Casey J. Dawkins. 2004. “Urban Containment and Residential Segregation: A Preliminary Investigation.” Urban Studies.41(2): 423-440.

[45] Arthur C. Nelson and Susan M. Wachter. 2003. “Growth Management and Affordable Housing Policy.” Journal of Housing and Community Development Law. 12(2): 173-187.

[46] Arthur C. Nelson. 2002. “Comment: Have Housing Prices Risen Faster in Portland Than Elsewhere?”  Housing Policy Debate 13(1): 33-42.

[47] Arthur C. Nelson.  2001. "Exclusionary Housing, Urban Sprawl, and Smart Growth."  Georgia State University Law Review. 17(4): 1087-1102

[48] Arthur C. Nelson and David R. Peterman. 2000.  "Does Growth Management Matter?" Journal of Planning Education and Research. 19(3): 277-286.

[49] Arthur C. Nelson.  1999. "Comparing States With and Without Growth Management: Analysis Based on Indicators With Policy Implications." Land Use Policy 16: 121-127.

[50] Arthur C. Nelson, James C. Nicholas and Julian C. Juergensmeyer. 2009.  Impact Fees: Principles and Practice of Proportionate-Share Development Fees. Chicago: American Planning Association.

[51] Arthur C. Nelson, Liza Bowles, Julian C. Juergensmeyer and James C. Nicholas. 2008. A Guide to Impact Fees and Housing Affordability. Washington, DC: Island Press.

[52] Greg Burge, Arthur C. Nelson, Trey Trosper, James Nicholas, and Julian Juergensmeyer, Can Development Impact Fees Help Mitigate Urban Sprawl? Journal of the American Planning Association.

[53] Arthur C. Nelson. 1995. "Development Impact Fees: The Next Generation," Urban Lawyer, 26(3): 541-562.

[54] Arthur C. Nelson with James E. Frank and James C. Nicholas. 1992. "Positive Influence of Impact-Fee Policy in Urban Planning and Development," Journal of Urban Planning and Development, 118(2): 59-64.

[55] Arthur C. Nelson with James C. Nicholas, and Julian C. Juergensmeyer. 1990. "Critical Elements of Impact Fee Programs." Journal of Urban Planning and Development 116(1): 34-47.

[56] Karen Seggerman, Arthur C. Nelson, et al. 2009. Florida Mobility Fee Study. Center for Transportation Research, University of South Florida.

[57] Arthur C. Nelson. 1995. Water, Wastewater, and Stormwater System Development Charges. Boca Raton, FL: CRC and Lewis Publishers.

[58] Raymond J. Burby, Arthur C. Nelson and Thomas W. Sanchez. 2006. The Problems of Containment and the Promise of Planning. In Eugenie L. Birch and Susan M. Wachter, eds., Rebuilding Urban Places After Disaster, University of Pennsylvania Press (Philadelphia), pp 47-65.

[59] Arthur C. Nelson and Steven P. French. 2002. "Plan Quality and Mitigating Damage From Natural Disasters: Case Study of the Northridge Earthquake With Planning Policy Considerations.  Journal of the American Planning Association. 68(2):194-207. 

[60] Richard B. Peiser and Arthur C. Nelson.  1997. "Using Master Planning Expert Panels to Achieve Planning Objectives." Journal of the American Planning Association 63(4): 439-453. 

[61] Terry Moore and Arthur C. Nelson. 1994. Lessons for Effective Urban-Containment and Resource-Land- Preservation." Journal of Urban Planning and Development 120(4): 157-173. 

[62] Arthur C. Nelson and Terry Moore. 1993. "Assessing Urban Growth Management." Land Use Policy 10(3): 293-302.

[63] Arthur C. Nelson and Terry Moore. 1993. "Case Study of the Effectiveness of Coastal Growth Management in a Growth Management State." Coastal Management 197-208.

[64] Arthur C. Nelson and David R. Peterman. 2000.  "Does Growth Management Matter?" Journal of Planning Education and Research. 19(3): 277-286.

[65] Arthur C. Nelson and Susan J. McClesky. 1990. "Elevated Rapid Rail Station Impacts on Single-Family House Values," Transportation Research Record, 1266: 173-180. 

[66] Arthur C. Nelson. 1992. "Effects of Heavy-Rail Transit Stations on House Prices With Respect to Neighborhood Income," Transportation Research Record, 1359: 127-132. 

[67] Arthur C. Nelson. 1999.  "Transit Stations and Commercial Property Values." Journal of Public Transportation, 2(3): 77-96. 

[68] Arthur C. Nelson with Michael E. Meyer and Catherine B. Ross.  1997. "Rail Transit in the Suburbs: Case Study of Transit Use in Atlanta's Affluent Northern Tier," Transportation Research Record, 1571: 142-150. 

[69] Arthur C. Nelson and Thomas Sanchez. 1997. "Influence of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority on Population and Employment Patterns."  Transportation Research Record, 1604: 18-25. 

[70] Arthur C. Nelson. 1997. Social Benefits of Transit: Case Study of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority. Transportation Research Record, 1576: 125-131.

[71] Arthur C. Nelson with Kenneth J. Dueker. 1990. "The Exurbanization of America." Journal of Planning Education and Research 9(2): 91-100. 

[72] Arthur C. Nelson. 1992. "Characterizing Exurbia." Journal of Planning Literature 6(4): 350-368. 

[73] Judy S. Davis, Arthur C. Nelson, and Kenneth J. Dueker. 1994.  "The New 'Burbs." Journal of the American Planning Association, 60(1): 45-60. 

[74] Arthur C. Nelson with William J. Drummond, and David S. Sawicki. 1995. "Exurban Industrialization: Implications for Economic Development Policy." Economic Development Quarterly 9(2): 119-133. 

[75] Arthur C. Nelson with William J. Drummond, and David S. Sawicki. 1994. "Economic Development Policy Implications of Exurban Industrialization," Economic Development Review, 12. 

[76] Arthur C. Nelson with William J. Drummond and David S. Sawicki.  1998. "Determinants of Exurban Industrialization with Implications for Economic Development Practitioners."  Economic Development Review. 16.

[77] Thomas W. Sanchez and Arthur C. Nelson. 1997. "Exurban and Suburban Residents: A Departure from Traditional Location Theory?" Journal of Housing Research, 8(2): 249-276. 

[78] Thomas W. Sanchez and Arthur C. Nelson. 1999. "Debunking the Exurban Myth." Housing Policy Debate. 10(3): 689-709. 

[79] Arthur C. Nelson, 1999. The Exurban Battleground. In Contested Landscapes edited by Mark Lapping and Owen Furuseth. London: Avebury. 

[80] Arthur C. Nelson and Thomas W. Sanchez. 2005. The Effectiveness of Urban Containment Regimes in Reducing Exurban Sprawl. DISP 160: 42-47 (January). 

[81] Arthur C. Nelson. 1995. "The Planning of Exurban America: Lessons from Frank Lloyd Wright's Broadacre City." Journal of Architecture and Planning Research 12(4): 337-356.

[82] Arthur C. Nelson. 1993. "Disamenity Influences of Edge Cities on Exurban Land Values: A Theory with Empirical Evidence and Policy Implications." Urban Studies 30(10): 1683-1690. 

[83] Arthur C. Nelson with John Genereux. 1992. "Price Effects of Landfills on House Values." Land Economics 68(4): 359-367. 

[84] Arthur C. Nelson with John Genereux and M. Michelle Genereux. 1997. "Price Effects of Landfills on Different House Value Strata."  Journal of Urban Planning and Development, 123(3): 59-67. 

[85] Arthur C. Nelson. 2003. “Locating Major Public Venues Where They Make a Difference.” Journal of Public Works Management and Policy 7(2): 98-114. 

[86] Arthur C. Nelson, 1999.  Sports Stadia and Central City Revitalization.  In Fritz W. Wagner, Timothy E. Joder and Anthony J. Mumphrey, Jr., eds., Physical Managing Capital Resources for Central  City Revitalization, New York: Garland, pp. 117-146. 

[87] Arthur C. Nelson. 2001. "Prosperity or Blight? A Question of Major League Stadia Locations." Economic Development Quarterly 15(3): 255-265. 

[88] Arthur C. Nelson and Mitchell Moody. 2000.  "Effect of Beltways on Metropolitan Economic Activity."  Journal of Urban Planning and Development. 126(4): 189-196. 

[89] Arthur C. Nelson and Gerrit J. Knaap. 1987. "A Theoretical and Empirical Argument for Regional Sewer Planning." Journal of the American Planning Association 53(4): 479-486. 

[90] Arthur C. Nelson and Steven P. French. 2002. "Plan Quality and Mitigating Damage From Natural Disasters: Case Study of the Northridge Earthquake With Planning Policy Considerations. Journal of the American Planning Association. 68(2):194-207. 

[91] Raymond J. Burby, Arthur C. Nelson, Dennis Parker, and John Handmer.  2001. "Urban Containment Policy and Exposure to Natural Hazards: Is There a Connection?"  Journal of Environmental Planning and Management 44(4) 475-490. 

[92] Raymond J. Burby, Arthur C. Nelson and Thomas W. Sanchez. 2006. The Problems of Containment and the Promise of Planning. In Eugenie L. Birch and Susan M. Wachter, eds., Rebuilding Urban Places After Disaster, University of Pennsylvania Press (Philadelphia), pp 47-65. 

[93] Arthur C. Nelson. 1995. "Growth Management and the Savings-and-Loan Bailout."  Urban Lawyer 27(1): 71-85. 

[94] Arthur C. Nelson.  2000. "Reducing Financial Risk Through Needs Certification." Journal of Urban Planning and Development, 126(1): 39-54. 

[95] Gerrit J. Knaap and Arthur C. Nelson. 1993. The Regulated Landscape: Lessons of Statewide Planning From Oregon. Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. 

[96] Gerrit Knaap and Arthur C. Nelson. 1988. "The Effects of Regional Land Use Controls in Oregon: A Theoretical and Empirical Review." The Review of Regional Studies 18(2): 37-46.  

[97] Arthur C. Nelson and Terry Moore. 1993. "Case Study of the Effectiveness of Coastal Growth Management in a Growth Management State." Coastal Management 197-208. 

[98] Arthur C. Nelson and Terry Moore. 1993. "Assessing Urban Growth Management." Land Use Policy 10(3): 293-302. 

[99] Terry Moore and Arthur C. Nelson. 1994. Lessons for Effective Urban-Containment and Resource-Land- Preservation." Journal of Urban Planning and Development 120(4): 157-173. 

[100] Arthur C. Nelson. 1992. "Elements of Effective State Land-Use Planning Policy." Journal of Urban Planning and Development 118(3): 97-105. 

[101] Raymond J. Burby and Arthur C. Nelson. 1991. "Local Government and Public Adaptation to Sea-Level Rise." Journal of Urban Planning and Development 117(4): 140-153. 

[102] Arthur C. Nelson. 2006. Leadership in a New Era. Journal of the American Planning Association. 72(4): 393-409.

[103] Arthur C. Nelson. 2004. Toward a New Metropolis: The Opportunity to Rebuild America. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.

[104] Arthur C. Nelson. 2013. Reshaping Metropolitan America: Trends and Opportunities to 2030. Washington, DC: Island Press.

[105] Arthur C. Nelson. 2014. Foundations of Real Estate Development Financing: A Guide for Public-Private Partnerships. Washington, DC: Island Press.

[106] Arthur C. Nelson. 2009. The New Urbanity: The Rise of a New America. Annuals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 626: 192-208.

[107] Arthur C. Nelson. 2012. The Mass Market for Suburban Low-Density Development is Over. The Urban Lawyer, 44(4): 29—40.

[108] Reid Ewing, Arthur C. Nelson, Keith Bartholomew, Phil Emmi and Bruce Appleyard. 2011. Response to Special Report 298 Driving and the Built Environment: The Effects of Compact Development on Motorized Travel, Energy Use and CO2 Emissions. Journal of Urbanism 4(1): 75–79. 

[109] Arthur C. Nelson and KathyYoung. 2008. The Limited Role of Downtowns in Meeting Metropolitan Housing Needs. Journal of Urban Planning and Development. 134(1): 1-8.

[110] Arthur C. Nelson. 2013. Toward a New Suburban America. Planning Theory and Practice. 14(3): 392-402.

[111] Lang, Robert E., Arthur C. Nelson and Rebecca Sohmer. 2008.  Boomburb Downtowns: The Next Generation of Urban Centers. Journal of Urbanism

[112] Arthur C. Nelson. 2010. Catching the Next Wave: Older Americans and the “New Urbanism.” Generations: 33(4): 37-42.

[113] Robert E. Lang and Arthur C. Nelson. 2008. Defining Megapolitan Regions. In Catherine B. Ross and Cheryl Contant, eds., Megaregions: Planning for Global Competitiveness Washington, DC: Island Press. 

[114] Robert E. Lang and Arthur C. Nelson. 2007. Beyond the Metroplex: Examining Commuting Patterns at the “Megapolitan” Scale. Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

[115] Arthur C. Nelson and Robert E. Lang. 2011. Megapolitan America:  A New Vision for Understanding America’s Metropolitan Geography. Chicago: American Planning Association.

 

 


Recognitions

  • Dr. Arthur C. Nelson, Associate Dean for Research and Discovery was interviewed by Bill Buckmaster, host of the ... Read More
  • Dr. Arthur C. Nelson, Associate Dean for Research and Discovery will be interviewed by Bill Buckmaster, host of the... Read More
  • "In case you have not noticed, downtown Tucson is on the rebound. This is consistent with national trends that I have... Read More
  • Dr. Arthur C. Nelson, Associate Dean for Research and Discovery, gave a presentation to the Albuquerque Board of Realtor... Read More
  • Dr. Arthur C. Nelson, Associate Dean for Research and Discovery, was the featured speaker at the Georgia State University... Read More
  • Dean Jan Cervelli announced a new scholarship. It is the Arthur C. Nelson Scholarship for graduate students in the School of... Read More
  • Dr. Arthur C. Nelson, Associate Dean for Research and Discovery gave a presentation to the Tucson chapter of the Certified... Read More
  • Arthur C. Nelson's AwardsFAICP- Fellow of the American Institute of Certified PlannersLambda Alpha, Honorary Society for... Read More
  • Dr. Arthur C. Nelson, Associate Dean for Research and Discovery, gave three papers at the annual conference of the... Read More

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Professor of Planning & Real Estate Development
Office Location: Architecture 304
Curriculum Vitae
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acnelson@email.arizona.edu