Mary C. Hardin, AIA, is currently Interim Dean and Professor in the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture at The University of Arizona. Mary previously served as Associate Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs for CAPLA, from 2011 to 2016. She has held a concomitant position as a Professor of Architecture, specializing in design-build studios and the provision of affordable housing.

Hardin has been a faculty member in CAPLA since 1997, and received her promotion from Associate to Full Professor in 2003. Her teaching included capstone studios, design-build studios and courses in the materials and methods of construction. Her research interests include affordable housing design, energy and water conserving technologies for affordable housing, and the adaptation of rammed earth production methods for low cost housing. She is a registered architect and licensed residential contractor in Arizona.

Interim Dean Hardin obtained her undergraduate degree, a Bachelor of Liberal Arts with a Concentration in Architecture, and her professional degree, a Master of Architecture, at The University of Texas at Austin. She practiced architecture in Austin from 1983 to 1989, while also teaching in the School of Architecture at The University of Texas at Austin. In 1989, she relocated to Arizona and taught at Arizona State University as an Assistant and Associate Professor before joining the faculty at The University of Arizona. She served as Interim Director of the School of Architecture in 2010-11.

Hardin has received national awards for teaching, design-build project delivery, affordable housing policy initiatives and collaborative practice, as well as state AIA awards for her project designs. She was awarded the AIA Education Honors Award, a Learn and Serve Faculty Scholar Award, a UA Academy Teaching Award, as well as the ACSA Collaborative Practice Award in 2001 and 2011 for her integration of education, professional practice, and community constituents in her design-build studio projects. She also received the national SEED (Social Economic Environmental Design) Award for her series of design-build residences, and seven AIA Awards for those projects as well as private commissions. A National Urban Policy Initiative Award and a book award were also related to the design-build projects.

Mary Hardin is also the President of the Drachman Design-Build Coalition (DDBC), a 501c3 non-profit organization formed for the purpose of involving faculty and students of CAPLA in design and construction projects that benefit the underserved population of Arizona. Incorporated in 2004, DDBC has a mission and history rooted in service learning and community outreach. Hardin has served on neighborhood design review boards since her arrival in Tucson, most recently joining the board in the Mercado District at the west end of the streetcar line. She is currently working with rising fifth year Architecture students on the design and construction of an affordable, energy efficient residence in the A-Mountain community.


Recognitions

  •  The UA School of Architecture in collaboration with other Design/Build Schools in the US and Canada... Read More

  • Two projects by SoA Professor and Associate Dean Mary Hardin garnered awards from 2013 AIA Southern... Read More

  • DDBC Residence 5, the design-build studio project designed and constructed by the ARC Studio 451b (fall... Read More

  • The Downtown Tucson dwelling of  Mary Hardin, CAPLA Associate Dean of Academic and Faculty Affairs and Professor,... Read More

  • The sixteenth Structures for Inclusion (SFI 16) conference was held on March 19-20, 2016 in Raleigh, North... Read More
  • Mary Hardin, Interim... Read More

Mary Hardin's picture

Interim Dean and Professor of Architecture
Office Location: CAPLA 120g
Curriculum Vitae
520-621-6751
mchardin@email.arizona.edu
Faculty member: 

Drachman Design-Build Coalition Residence 5 is a three bedroom, 2 bath residence of 1300 square feet in area. It was designed and constructed by School of Architecture faculty (Mary Hardin and David Bullaro) and students in 2013-2014. The main building features include a trombe wall and a modified trombe wall that serve as thermal masses to control indoor comfort, insulated concrete walls sheathed with galvanized metal panels, and cisterns for harvesting and storage of roof water runoff. The large expanse of glass used in the trombe walls was reclaimed from the remodelling of the CAPLA gallery space.

Faculty member: 

The Hardin Residence is a 1350 square foot courtyard house built as a rowhouse in the El Mercado District west of downtown Tucson. The formal entry is from a pedestrian plaza, with a south-facing structural adobe wall serving as a thermal mass to condition the living space within. A steel brise-soleil shading structure protects the southern glass from over-exposure. All of the living spaces are organized around a central courtyard, for access to natural light and ventilation. The many steel fabrications were designed in collaboration with Jason Gallo. Photographs by Liam Frederick.

Faculty member: 

Drachman Design-Build Coalition Residence 6 is a three bedroom, 2 bath residence of 1200 square feet in area. It was designed and constructed by School of Architecture faculty (Mary Hardin and Bil Taylor) and students in 2011-2012. It is owned and occupied by a family of two. The main building features include rammed earth walls that serve as thermal masses to control indoor comfort, two courtyards that allow natural light and ventilation to reach all habitable spaces, insulated framed walls sheathed with fiber cement panels or galvanized metal panels, and cisterns for harvesting and storage of roof water runoff.

Faculty member: 

The Elser House is a rammed earth, steel and glass residence in Apache Junction, AZ, designed by Mary Hardin and Richard Eribes for the Elser family. The main feature of the home is a long volume of structural steel and glass that traverses the steeply sloped site from west to east, organizing the views toward the Superstition Mountains and serving as a circulation spine for the bedrooms and public spaces. All of the other spaces are defined by rammed earth walls that run parallel to the grades, establishing each volume as a separate level and retaining earth upslope. Four courtyards are captured between the enclose volumes of the house, thus extending the perceived space of the home and providing sheltered outdoor living area.

Faculty member: 

Drachman Design-Build Coalition Residence 4 is a three bedroom, 2 bath residence of 1200 square feet in area. It was designed and constructed by School of Architecture faculty (Mary Hardin and Bil Taylor) and students in 2009-2010. It is owned and occupied by a family of five. The main building features include integra-block walls that serve as both insulation and thermal mass, three courtyards that allow natural light and ventilation to reach all habitable spaces, and innovative use of polycarbonate sheathing to create clerestory lighting all along the north side. 

Faculty member: 

Drachman Design-Build Coalition Residence 3 is a three bedroom, 2 bath residence of 1200 square feet in area. It was designed and constructed by School of Architecture faculty (John Folan and Mary Hardin) and students in 2007-2008. It is owned and occupied by a family of three. The main building features include two courtyards that allow natural light and ventilation to reach all habitable spaces, a sliding wall panel that enables reconfiguration of interior space, a super-insulated building envelope, and innovative use of polycarbonate sheathing. 

Faculty member: 

Drachman Design-Build Coalition Residence 2 is a three bedroom, 2 bath residence of 1040 square feet in area. It was designed and constructed by School of Architecture faculty (Richard Eribes and Mary Hardin) and students in 2006-2007. It is owned and occupied by a family of four. The main building features include a flexible floor plan that allows reconfiguration of spaces by the use of sliding wall panels in several locations, natural light and ventilation to every room, and a vented cavity wall on the south side that increases the effectivity of the insulation through pre-cooling.

Faculty member: 

These are photos of Drachman Design-Build Coalition Residence 1, built in the A-Mountain Neighborhood with faculty (Mary Hardin and John Folan) and students of the School of Architecture in 2005-2006. The main materials are rammed earth, light gauge steel frame, and polycarbonate. It is owned and occupied by a family of three.